Category Archives: Education

When Learning Doesn’t Come Easy

From the moment we find out we are expecting a child, our minds and hearts overflow with hopes and dreams for them. My child will be the most beautiful, brilliant, talented little person to ever walk the Earth, right? And they are that to each of us!

But sometimes, we discover there is a “problem.” The last thing we want to admit is there is something different or wrong with our child. It’s a hard thing to do. Not that we love them any less! But let’s be honest, we would rather sit around other moms and share how our 4 year old can read a chapter book, do multiplication at age 6 and paint like Rembrandt by age 7. Not to mention, they are also on their way to the Olympics in two different sports. Or at least it seems that way when you are the one quietly listening to all the achievements of other people’s children!

So, let’s get a few things straight… Most likely those other moms are exaggerating a wee bit! And there is nothing wrong with your child! Even if your child has a learning disability. She or he simply learns differently than the mainstream! And really, that is kind of cool!

I didn’t always feel that way though. After struggling to teach my daughter to read for 3 years with little progress I was getting pretty frustrated and so was she. Each school session ended in tears and some days started in tears with the mere mention of reading. She had always loved books and being read to and was excited to learn how to read by herself. So, why was it such a struggle? Was I just a bad teacher? Was she too easily distracted and not self motivated enough?

We finally decided to get testing done at age 7. I had noticed a lot of letter and word reversal while reading and writing as well as in math. She complained of her head and eyes hurting when reading (and a vision test found her to have 20/20 eyesight). I needed to know what was holding us back. I knew she was extremely intelligent in so many ways but we were hitting a brick wall. Since we homeschool, we decided to have her tested with a private therapist. It took 4 hours to complete and when finished we were told she had visual and auditory processing disorders.

I then went into mom research mode! And as I read and searched the internet and library, I became more and more confused and overwhelmed! There did not seem to be any truly helpful book or website and those I found seemed to tell me different things! We did decide to go to vision therapy, which of course is not covered by insurance, are any of us surprised? But we felt it was worth a try and worth the money. In therapy, she worked on re-learning phonics using A Time for Phonics. We also did assigned therapy at home. After 6 months she finished and I could definitely see a huge improvement! We did not do auditory therapy with the therapist because of cost, but I did use a program called Earobics for at home. I also found the book, The Out of Sync Child and When the Brain Can’t Hear very helpful.

My search continued to find other ways to help her learn in a way that fit her learning styles. You see, processing disorders and dyslexia do not have to be a roadblock! There are so many ways to learn. The point where I realized this was when I happened to find a book by Ben Foss, The Dyslexia Empowerment Plan. I encourage everyone to read it! Check out his website also! I kind of hate the word accommodations. It makes it sound like you need extra or special help, sort of like you are being allowed to cheat. There should be no shame in learning differently. Figure out what your child’s strengths are and harness those skills. Don’t focus on the standard way most kids are taught to read. I have been so incredibly thankful that we chose to homeschool because my daughter did not have to compare herself to others or be labeled in any way. But even if your child is in public or private school, remember your child is not broken, but the system may be. Advocate for your child to have the resources they need to excel and feel connected.

What resources can you use? Oh, there are so many! This is where I got overwhelmed! I am going to list some of the resources I felt were the best. But look around more and explore the options available!

-Audiobooks are your friend! Don’t get behind learning because you can’t read the material fast enough! If your child learns well by listening, give Audible a try. Amazon has audiobooks as well and so does your local library.
-A reading focus card. You can make your own or buy one. Also try printing your pages on yellow paper, or try other colors other than the usual white.
-Use a text-to-speech app such as Speak It or Talk to Me, and also a speech-to-text app such as Dragon Dictation. Another helpful app is Prizmo, users can scan in any kind of text document and have the program read it out loud, which can be a big help to those who struggle with reading.
-I love Snapwords for learning sitewords! There is also an app for Snapwords now!
-Fonts and background colors: Software that is regularly used in schools, such as Microsoft Word, is a good resource for fonts and background colors. Changing the background color to green, for example, can help with reading as can wearing green glasses. Fonts can also enable reading and understanding; teachers can download free specialist fonts, such as OpenDyslexic, which are free and can run on Microsoft software.
-All About Spelling, this curriculum is great for all children but the multi-sensory approach based on the Orton-Gillingham methods clicked with my daughter! We have not tried All About Reading but I would bet it is a good option.
-We used Rocket Phonics after we had finished vision therapy. It was developed by a dyslexic man, and it is fun! There are many games involved and interesting stories to read, not the usual boring books that are your typical easy reading.
-Math has been a struggle for us as well as reading. Memorizing facts is a challenge. I found a math program that uses learning by association, employing fact and process mnemonics called Semple Math.
-Get HANDS ON! Use clay, paints, blocks, magnets, etc. to practice letters, spelling, and sounds. Learn to write letters correctly first in sand with index finger, then move to writing with a pencil. Make it FUN! Use all the senses!
-Play games! Some we have used and enjoy are Sum Swamp, What’s Gnu?, Scrabble, Very Silly Sentences, Boggle Jr. even card games like addition war (lay down two cards each and add together), or Alphabet Go Fish (you have to say the letter sounds), search Pinterest and the internet for fun games to practice math facts and letter sounds or spelling and sight words. Even if your child is older, there are hands on ideas that are fun and multi-sensory

Moms (and Dads), my point in writing this is to give you some starting points. And to let you know that you are not alone! I know it can be disappointing at first to learn your child is struggling in some way. But it can also feel like a weight has been lifted to know how your child learns and that there are ways to help and empower your little one. I know if you are in a school setting, you will have to explain to your child why they may go to a special class or take tests differently than the other kids. You have to trust yourself to know how to talk to your child. There are books for kids that talk about dyslexia and learning issues in a positive light such as, Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco, The Alphabet War by Diane Robb, and for older children May B by Caroline Rose or Niagra Falls, Or Does It? By Henry Winkler (yes, Fonzie from Happy Days!)

Try to emphasize his/her strengths and affinities and do not simply focus on his/her weaknesses and difficulties. Remind your child that he/she can, indeed, learn but that he/she learns in a unique way, and that is OK! We all are unique and have our own strengths and weaknesses. Love your child for who they are and hopefully, they will find the right tools to make learning soar!

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4 Strategies to Become a Transformative Educator

When you are assigned a class and students arrive, do you view yourself as a teacher, instructor, or educator? Is your role a function, one which completes tasks and responsibilities, or do you aspire to accomplish more with your students? Do you consider the instructional strategies you use now to be transformative in some manner, or would you like to somehow transform the students you teach?

A person enters the field of education as a profession, either full-time in a traditional academic institution or as an adjunct (or part time) instructor. A traditional full-time professor may likely be responsible for conducting research, teaching, and publishing scholarly work. An adjunct instructor may teach in a community college, traditional college, or an online school. When someone teaches students within the field of higher education, he or she may be called a facilitator, instructor, or professor. This is important as you won’t find a job title with the word educator in it.

Does this mean that everyone who is a teacher, professor, instructor, faculty member, or adjunct, is also an educator? What I have learned through my work in higher education is that everyone who is in one of these roles is doing their best to teach and guide a learning process, whether they are involved in undergraduate or graduate degree courses. However, someone who considers themselves to be an educator is a person who goes beyond the role of teaching and seeks to lead a transformational learning process. I have learned myself that becoming an educator is not an automatic process. It takes time, practice, and dedication to become an engaging and transformative educator.

A Basic Definition of a Teacher

Teaching is generally associated with traditional, primary education. Classes at this level are teacher-led and children as students are taught what and how to learn. The teacher is the expert and directs the learning process. A teacher is someone highly trained and works to engage the minds of his or her students. This style of teacher-led instruction continues into higher education, specifically traditional college classrooms. The teacher still stands at the front and center of the class delivering information, and students are used to this format because of their experience in primary education. The instructor disseminates knowledge through a lecture, and students will study to pass the required examinations or complete other required learning activities.

Within higher education, teachers may be called instructors and they are hired as subject matter experts with advanced content or subject matter expertise. The job requirements usually include holding a specific number of degree hours in the subject being taught. Teachers may also be called professors in traditional universities, and those positions require a terminal degree with additional research requirements. For all of these roles, teaching is meant to signify someone who is guiding the learning process by directing, telling, and instructing students. The instructor or professor is in charge, and the students must comply and follow as directed.

Here is something to consider: If this is the essence of teaching, is there a difference between teaching and educating students? Is the role of a teacher the same as that of an educator?

Basic Definitions of an Educator

I would like for you to consider some basic definitions to begin with as a means of understanding the role of an educator. The word “education” refers to giving instruction; “educator” refers to the person who provides instruction and is someone skilled in teaching; and “teaching” is aligned with providing explanations. I have expanded upon these definitions so the word “educator” includes someone who is skilled with instruction, possesses highly developed academic skills, and holds both subject matter knowledge, along with knowledge of adult education principles.

• Skilled with Instruction: An educator is someone who should be skilled in the art of classroom instruction, knowing what instructional strategies are effective and the areas of facilitation that need further development.

An experienced educator develops methods which will bring course materials to life by adding relevant context and prompting students to learn through class discussions and other learning activities. Instruction also includes all of the interactions held with students, including all forms of communication, as every interaction provides an opportunity for teaching.

• Highly Developed Academic Skills: An educator must also have strong academic skills and at the top of that list are writing skills. This requires strong attention to detail on the part of the educator must include all forms of messages communicated. The ability to demonstrate strong academic skills is especially important for anyone who is teaching online classes as words represent the instructor.

The use of proper formatting guidelines, according to the style prescribed by the school, is also included in the list of critical academic skills. For example, many schools have implemented APA formatting guidelines as the standard for formatting papers and working with sources. An educator cannot adequately guide students and provide meaningful feedback if the writing style has not been mastered.

• Strong Knowledge Base: An educator needs to develop a knowledge base consisting of their subject matter expertise, as related to the course or courses they are teaching, along with knowledge of adult education principles. I know of many educators who have the required credit hours on their degree transcripts, yet they may not have extensive experience in the field they teach. This will still allow them to teach the course, provided they take time to read the required textbook or materials, and find methods of applying it to current practices within the field.

Many schools hire adjuncts with work experience as the primary criteria, rather than knowledge of adult learning principles. When I have worked with faculty who do have studied adult education theory, they generally acquired it through ongoing professional development. That was my goal when I decided on a major for my doctorate degree, to understand how adults learn so I could transform my role and become an educator.

4 Strategies to Become a Transformative Educator

I do not believe many instructors intentionally consider the need to make a transformation from working as an instructor to functioning as an educator. When someone is hired to teach a class, someone other than a traditional college professor, they often learn through practice and time what works well in the classroom. There will likely be classroom audits and recommendations made for ongoing professional development.

Gradually the typical instructor will become an educator as they seek out resources to help improve their teaching practices. However, I have worked with many adjunct online instructors who rely upon their subject matter expertise alone and do not believe there is a reason to grow as an educator.

For anyone who would like to become an engaging and transformative educator, there are strategies which can be can be implemented.

Strategy #1: Transform Through Development of Your Instructional Practice

While any educator can learn through time on the job, it is possible to become intentional about this growth. There are numerous online resources, publications, workshops, webinars, and professional groups which will allow you to learn new methods, strategies, and practices. There are also social media websites such as LinkedIn and Twitter which allow for the exchange of ideas and resources within a global community of educators.

You can also utilize self-reflection as a means of gauging your effectiveness. I have found that the best time to review my instructional practice occurs immediately after a class has concluded. That is a time when I can assess the strategies I have used and determine if those methods were effective. Even reviewing end of course student surveys may provide insight into the perspective of my students, whether or not every survey submitted was positive. Students tend to submit a survey response either when they are happy or greatly unhappy about the course. Either way, I can learn something about what my students have experienced during the class.

Strategy #2: Transform Through Development of Your Academic Skills

I know from my work with online faculty development this is an area of development many educators could use. However, it is often viewed as a low priority until it is noted in classroom audits. If an educator has weak academic writing skills, it will interfere with their ability to provide comprehensive feedback for students.

For online instructors, this has an even greater impact when posted messages contain errors with spelling, grammar, and formatting. The development of academic skills can be done through the use of online resources or workshops. Many online schools I have worked for offer faculty workshops and this is a valuable self-development resource.

Strategy #3: Transform Through Development of Your Subject Matter Expertise

Every educator has subject matter expertise they can draw upon. However, the challenge is keeping this knowledge current as you continue to teach for several years. The best advice I can offer is find resources which allow you to read and learn about current thinking, research, and best practices in your chosen field.

This is essential to your instructional practice as students can easily tell whether you appear to be current in your knowledge, or outdated and seemingly out of touch. Even the use of required textbooks or resources does not ensure that you are utilizing the most current information as knowledge evolves quickly in many fields.

Strategy #4: Transform Through Development of Your Knowledge of Adult Learning

The last step or strategy I can recommend is to gain knowledge about adult learning theories, principles, and practices. If you are not familiar with the basics there are concepts you can research and includes critical thinking, andragogy, self-directed learning, transformational learning, learning styles, motivation, and cognition.

My suggestion is to find and read online sources related to higher education and then find a subject that interests you to research further. I have found the more I read about topics I enjoy, the more I am cultivating my interest in ongoing professional development. What you will likely find is what you learn will have a positive influence on your work as an educator and this will enhance all areas of your instructional practice.

Working as an educator, or someone who is highly engaged in the process of helping students learn, starts with a commitment to make this a career rather than a job. I have developed a vision related to how I want to be involved in each class I teach and I recommend the same strategy for you. You may find it useful to develop teaching goals for your career and link your classroom performance to those goals. For example, do you want to complete the required facilitation tasks, or would you rather put in the additional time necessary to create nurturing class conditions?

After developing a vision and teaching goals, you can create a professional development plan to prompt your learning and growth in all of the areas I have addressed above. While this strategy may require an investment of time, it is helpful to remember that we always make time for whatever we believe is most important.

Being an educator is not sustaining a focus on job functions, rather it is cultivating a love of what you do and learning how to excel for the benefit of your students. Becoming an engaging and transformative educator occurs when you decide teaching students is only part of the learning process, and you work to transform who you are and how you function, while working and interacting with your students.

When you transform your teaching or faculty role and become an educator, regardless of your job title, you also transform the learning experience of your students. You provide for them the critical element necessary for real learning to occur, substantive instructor involvement and engagement. More importantly, you humanize the learning experience and you can help to nurture their developmental needs. Students will leave your class transformed in some manner, having learned something they can apply to their academic pursuits, life, and/or career. You will be transformed and so will your students. You can claim Tax deductions for estate planning in the US, as well as tax on savings to cover taxes owed from overseas. Visit Free Wills to Print if you have an estate plan and can use the tax write off.

Belief – Must It Make Sense?

Are you old enough to believe, that for every drop of rain that falls, a flower grows? Or, that somewhere in the darkest night, a candle glows? What about the notion that for everyone that goes astray, someone will come to show the way? Even when they were written some people didn’t accept these sentiments. They had the belief that to be true something must be proved as tangibly so. The growth of scientific culture could mean we might all end up thinking that there is a demonstrable explanation for everything and if there isn’t, well we can’t really believe in it.

We sometimes meet gullible individuals like the flat-earther’s who seem to be able to believe almost anything. This attitude is mocked in Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass when the White Queen says,

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

So, what should we actually acknowledge to be true? Do beliefs have to make sense before we accept them?

Belief and open-mindedness
I guess we differ a lot in our natural makeup. Perhaps this affects the way we are inclined to think about things. For example, according to the prevailing ‘Five Factor Model of Personality’, those who are conventional and traditional in outlook prefer familiar routines to new experiences and tend to have a narrower range of interests. At the other end of the scale are those who are more open to experience, with curiosity about ideas and sensitivity to aesthetic expression, and give more attention to inner feelings and imagination. Being closed-minded or open-minded are two poles apart and most people fall somewhere along the continuum between them. However, it’s notdifficult to see how this might affect the nature of one’s beliefs.

Belief and a tough-minded disposition
Many of our political beliefs and social attitudes seem to be influenced by what is called a tough-minded or tender-minded disposition. This psychological continuum was first described by William James and is part of Hans Eysenck’s two factor model of political attitude. For example some people think that more money should be spent on the justice system because more criminals should be caught and get what they deserve. On the other hand, others take the view that society should prevent crime by sharing resources more fairly and caring for people who are vulnerable.

Belief and how we make judgments
Belief can be more influenced by the heart or the head; by subjective experience or by objective rational logic. I reckon we are all inclined towards one of these two. Making sense more of our feelings or more of our thoughts. Are you more likely to believe in what you feel in your heart is valuable or is your belief more likely to be based on logical thought? The danger of the former can be a blind faith in some cause. The danger of the latter can be a cold impersonal conclusion.

Readiness to form a judgment
We all can perceive life using our bodily senses and intuitions. We also all can, if we wish, form conclusions about what we perceive. However, according to Carl Jung’s theory of Personality Typology, judging or perceiving can be the dominant mode. So, he reckoned that there are judging and perceiving types of personality. Judging types seek to order, rationalise, and structure their outer world, as they actively judge external stimuli. They prefer to make decisions quickly and to stick to their conclusions once made. On the other hand, perceiving types do not seek to impose order on the outer world, but are more adaptive, perceptive, and open, as they receive external stimuli. They have a flexible, open-ended approach to life.

Belief and religious orientation
I suspect that similar to this perceiving type is the so-called Quest religious orientation. According to Daniel Batson’s theory people with this orientation treat their spirituality not as a means or an end, but as a search for truth.

An individual who approaches religion in this way recognizes that he or she does not know, and probably never will know, the final truth about such matters. Still the questions are deemed important, and however tentative and subject to changes, answers are sought.” (Daniel Batson, social psychologist)

Belief and personal development
I would suggest that we perceive things through a natural, moral or spiritual lens according to our personal development. At a first stage of personal development we tend to see life in terms of physical things and according to an instinctive need to be nurtured and have intimacy. And so we make sense of experiences in relation to these factors. Further development involves basing one’s belief on what is good and right in interpersonal conduct. e.g. belief to do with moral values of fairness and integrity. Further on still, one’s ideas may be illuminated by a deeper perception of what is good in life e.g. human well-being, a meaning and purpose to life and an awareness of a hidden power behind the universe. For example, that there is a life force and design within nature – not measurable by science but felt as something universal and infinite.

Belief and understanding
So far, I’ve been making out a case that individual differences in natural tendency and personal development affect how we make sense of the world and thus shape our belief. However, now I would ask could it be that there is an important additional factor. Is it a rational understanding inherent to being truly human? If so it is:

“Our ability to see and know, if we try, what is true and what is good”(Emanuel Swedenborg, spiritual philosopher)

Because of this understanding, I would say we can discern between what makes sense and what doesn’t. Without this capacity how could we have self-awareness and self-reflection? Without it how could we look at the pro’s and con’s of some proposal without undue bias? And without it how could we have a conscience of what is right in the face of unwholesome desires.

In other words this rationality is present no matter what kind of temperament and tendencies we are born with, and no matter whether we are functioning at a natural, ethical or spiritual level. It enables us to evaluate what ideas we hear about independently of our desires. Consequently, I would conclude that it obliges us to form our beliefs on the basis of what makes rational sense using a higher light of understanding.

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The Psychology of Genius

On the power of genius and the need to develop practical psychological models and solutions to nurture geniuses.

I’ve written a lot about the creative genius already. However the psychological profile of geniuses needs a separate discussion because it is very interesting and the traits or attributes of genius are so unique that they need proper identification and delineation. Genius is marked by high levels of intelligence, an intelligence quotient IQ score above 145, exceptionally high levels of independence and high levels of creativity. Most profound geniuses are very independent in their thinking, highly creative and have very high levels of intelligence. A genius is usually defined by these primary attributes of intelligence, creativity and independence. There are however some distinct attributes that differentiate the genius from the other humans.

Genius and Personality: Geniuses have unique personalities and attributes. They are the rule-breakers, system-busters, world changers, visionaries and pioneers. In societies where the geniuses are recognized and appreciated, they have better opportunities of utilizing their talents. But geniuses in less developed societies or say in conflict zones, may not have the right kind of opportunities and may tend to withdraw and some may become depressed, schizophrenic or develop other types of mental illness. Without the right kind of opportunities and channels, some may become antisocials and criminals. The genius personality is unique and they are usually very withdrawn and quiet or very outgoing and socially smart. Some geniuses may oscillate between being very withdrawn to being very social. Some writers, artists, innovators, creative geniuses may be prolific in their abilities and creative output but may be very quiet or silent in social situations and some may avoid all kinds of social interaction. Geniuses usually have very conspicuous leadership abilities, they will say things you will remember forever and they tend to have forceful and impactful personalities that you can’t miss and can’t ignore. Even the quiet ones will have an impact in their social interactions. Most geniuses, even the very quiet types are also significantly strong-willed, determined and a tad obsessive.

Genius and Power: Geniuses are very powerful and impressive, because they are confident of their abilities. They are sure of their qualities, they know they can influence and have a definite impact on people. They attract people with their brilliance and everyone is attracted to a genius. They are like social magnets. Geniuses are also highly intuitive and perceptive, so they understand people, they predict responses and reactions and are able to see through people’s motives. This keen psychological understanding of people is what makes the genius so powerful. Even the most socially withdrawn geniuses are super psychics and understand people very well. They simply know and understand apparently unexplainable stuff and since they are able predict responses, they know how to deal with people and situations. If a person of average intelligence comes up with five possible scenarios and options, geniuses will come up with 50 different possibilities. This ability to see all angles of a situation, makes them powerful because they can foresee and handle situations better. Geniuses can easily gauge the strengths and weaknesses of people so it’s easier for them to spot talents and understand who they could rely on for specific tasks. Geniuses are also more knowledgeable and as several philosophers have said and Bertrand Russell has reemphasized that, “Knowledge is Power”.

Genius and Sexuality: All geniuses are oversexed. Period. Sex drives and libido or life force is what drives the genius. The sex drive gives them their ambitions and inspire them to do what they want to do and many geniuses achieve extraordinary feats because of their life force or proper channeling of their sex drive. Some like Newton may get scared of the sex drive and try to suppress it and others like Picasso will openly flaunt it, but all geniuses are constantly haunted and tormented by their sexual desires. Geniuses do have an equally potent self-control alongside their explosive sexuality, so the self-control helps them to channel their desires to more constructive and creative pursuits. Some may take the route of denying or rejecting their sexuality as a kind of personal challenge and remain celibate for long periods of time. Research studies have indicated that most people of high intelligence stick to few sexual partners in their lifetimes. Some geniuses may consider themselves spiritually, intellectually or morally superior to have sex with the lesser mortals, so there is a level of pride and high self-esteem involved in the practice of celibacy. Geniuses are also more strongly mentally androgynous, they don’t have typical male or female traits and do not relate to typical gender issues, so there is a level of sexual confusion. Some like van Gogh may engage in several unsuccessful heterosexual or homosexual relationships. Many geniuses become gay, asexual or engage in forms of alternative sexuality. Oscar Wilde, Leonardo da Vinci are geniuses who were possibly more comfortable with their homosexual side of their androgynous personality. Many are bisexual, although some geniuses come to terms with their androgyny and practice socially acceptable forms of sexuality like heterosexual behavior and marry and have families and so on. Yet, deviant sexual behaviors such as celibacy, bisexuality, homosexuality, alternative sexuality are very common among geniuses.

Genius and Creativity: Genius is characterized by insatiable curiosity about everything, followed by the need to gain knowledge in many different spheres. They may be highly technical, may focus on one subject like computer science although many geniuses are interested in multiple subjects, and are multifaceted, multitaskers, and talented or gifted in many areas. They have this magical or supernatural ability to do many things very well. Some may focus on one field and become immensely productive in that specific field. The high level of creativity as seen in genius is usually a product of knowledge, imagination, independence and intelligence. Since genius is motivated by curiosity and have vast knowledge, this knowledge is then used along with imagination to give them unique and great ideas. One ingredient needed for this, is independence of thought. Geniuses are greatly independent in their thinking, they like to think out of the box, they are too proud to rely on other people’s ideas, so thinking independently gives them the necessary kick to boost their egos. They are thought leaders and thinking independently is a requirement to satisfy their creative, sexual or life drives as well. Independence of thinking gives them unparalleled creative abilities, so most geniuses excel in technological innovation, creative fields like writing, theatre or architecture or they may invent new types of music composition or dance methods. Usually geniuses will find an outlet for their creativity and they are usually very productive and prolific.

Genius and Insanity: Geniuses are usually a bit eccentric. They actually enjoy eccentricity, because madness helps them to release some of that high level of creative tension. Moreover geniuses are able to predict responses and foresee events, so they are able to analyze many factors quickly and act in ways that to most people will look a bit ‘crazy’. So there is usually an underlying method in the madness, along with the apparent madness in the method. But they have great insight, so they know they are acting mad and they are significantly courageous to stretch their imagination and actually engage in some temporary insanity, knowing very well that they have complete control over their minds. They are not scared of madness. People of average intelligence are controlled by their thoughts so they may actually become insane. Geniuses and people of very high intelligence actively control their minds so even if they apparently come across as insane, they have a pretty good hold on their thoughts so don’t exactly become mad. Having said that, some geniuses have found themselves battling deep depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and so on. Mental illness can set in among socially maladjusted geniuses. When geniuses are unable to find opportunities for their creativity or there is some sort of suppression of their creative talents, due to personal circumstances, they might lose their minds, become antisocials or completely insane. It is essential that we provide adequate opportunities to children and adults who show very high levels of intelligence. Highly intelligent children must be given additional creative tasks and encouraged to think independently so that they don’t get too frustrated with the lack of appreciation for their abilities.

Psychologists have a good understanding of genius and there are many theoretical models in psychology to explain the phenomenon of genius. Yet there are very few practical models and solutions to actually support, encourage, direct or nurture geniuses. Too many highly intelligent children are driven to insanity by the time they are teenagers and with increasing levels of intelligence among children worldwide, we need more practical or applied psychological solutions and models to understand and nurture geniuses of all ages and cultures.

What Is The Meaning Of Monday Blues?

Monday, as you know is the beginning of the week for almost all workers in many countries. You get two days rest, and your soul is at peace. Now once, again you have to go back to the grind. When you are at school, you would have been elated when it was Friday and dread the way the clock was ticking to go back to school on Monday.

Out of the seven colors, blue is one color. But as science grew, various factors began to be associated with colors such as emotions, attitudes, memories etc.

The question here is if you are satisfied with the work, the relationship with your colleagues or teachers at school etc.

Monday Blues can be described as the set of negative emotions, many experience on the first day of the work or school week if they are not satisfied. The emotions may vary from fatigue, depression, and feelings to put leave for the day in the notion that work or school environment is not pleasant but they cannot avoid absence.

The concept of Monday Blues was not taken into consideration fifty decades ago. But in recent times, it is widely recognized. They should be taken as a warning symptom that everything is not okay at school or work. If you are very energetic, excitement and energy flows in your body on Monday, you will not suffer from fatigue or depression for the following week.

Experts specify that you can become more successful in the field you love. On Monday morning, you will be bubbling with energy as you are doing what you love. At the same time, not being appreciated/unsatisfied appraisals can take a toll on your performance and it might seem like another painful starting of unwanted work. These factors can be termed as Monday Blues.

Your disregard of Monday can have a disastrous effect on the performance of your work. Some of the symptoms are less productivity, lack of motivational factors and the learning curve is very slow.

Motivational experts opine, “A bad mood or unwanted stress can have disastrous consequences on the entire work environment.” When a team member is unhappy, all the other members would have difficulty in staying happy, and as the proverb goes – if one finger is oiled, it oils the others.”

How To Beat The Heck Out Of Monday Blues

Identify The Challenges

The first step is to analyze what is wrong? If you are finding it challenging to go to office every day, then it is a factor that you should not laugh or just put down your head to live within. These are the symptoms which show that you are unhappy at work. It would be better and beneficial if you can fix the challenge or move on to the next job.

Environment Or Work

You do not want to go to work because a co-worker does not get along with you or you are doing the same work without learning anything, or you do not feel challenged anymore. It is better to clarify the nature of the challenge and try to improve.

Prepare on Friday for Monday: Getting Away From Monday Blues

As Monday is the beginning day of the week, it can be extra stressful. So complete the hard tasks on Friday so that you can take a breather. Do not leave unpleasant tasks for Monday. Also complete the work beforehand. Do not leave work for clients so that they have to make a call on the weekends.

Make A Time Table

Make a list of work that you want to complete and compete for the next week. If you are not able to list, then you need to relax and analyze regarding the working pattern.

Relax And Come Back Rejuvenated

It is mandatory that you go back to bed a little early on Sunday night, and get enough sleep. If you stay in the wee hours of night, naturally, you would not be interested to get up when the alarm does its work.

Dress Properly

Your dress should reflect a positive mood. On Monday wear your favorite dress. A good complement might work wonders for the whole week. For a happy life, a feeling of gratitude is necessary. Always treat with respect the seniors as well as juniors. Gratitude can break the ice in many situations.

Keep The Schedule Light

Having less work on Monday is a good contributor to productivity. The proverb holds comfort “Great challenges will take care of themselves.”

Have Fun

‘All work and no play make Jack a dull boy.’

This proverb is not only for boys, but also for adults. If you are concentrating only on the job, you will feel more tired and over time, the productivity will take a nose dive. Share jokes with co-workers or go to a movie with family.

The above-given factors are only some of the ways you can beat Monday Blues. If you are facing challenges at work, discuss with your spouse, family members or close friends. They can give you the best solution or may be, refer to another person who can identify the problem and give the answer that can change your life forever.

The Top Three Goals of Spiritual Recovery

Numerous lights await the person who endured a dysfunctional or abusive upbringing, yet bores through the tunnel of recovery to reach them.

Powerless, devoid of understanding, and justifying his parent’s detrimental treatment of him because of his own alleged deficiencies, he reacted in ways that ensured his survival, causing his brain to rewire itself into survival tactic pathways so that he could negotiate an adult world he erroneously believed was the equivalent of his home-of-origin one.

Unable to function in such a debilitated state for long, however, but not entirely understanding his personal restrictions and fears, he may seek help and answers in a spiritual twelve-step program, enabling him to progressively regain what his upbringing forced him to lose, such as trust, a reconnection with positive, genuine feelings to enhance his life experiences, a re-established link with a Higher Power of his understanding, and, finally, a reknit with the rest of humanity, so that he no longer perceives himself to be on the outside, looking in.

Three aspects, all of which are interconnected, can be considered the goals of such a program.

The first of these is the determination of a person’s own interests, abilities, strengths, talents, and aspirations in life.

“By moving beyond survival,” according to the Adult Children of Alcoholics textbook (World Service Organization, 2006, p. 429), “we realize that lost dreams or wishes can re-emerge. The return of dreams is a signal that we are continuing our separation-from-family work. We learned… that we had internalized many aspects of our parents’ thinking and behaving. We had no real identity or dreams separate from them. Even if we had moved far away, our parents and their dysfunction still lived inside us.”

Indeed, adopting his parents’ own derailed life plan can be considered an example of a parent-child boundary loss, but his motivation for doing so may have been an effort to please them and a last-ditch attempt to attain their love.

The second goal is to become his own autonomous person beyond the boundary-poor projections, which caused him to subconsciously adopt his parent’s image of him by means of their distorted mirrors.

“Often one or more (family) members are dysfunctional in some capacity so other members take on their roles,” according to Dr. Charles L. Whitfield in his book, Healing the Child Within (Health Communications, 1987, p. 48). “Everyone learns to mind everyone else’s business one way or another. What results is a group of family members who are enmeshed, fused, or have invaded or even overtaken one another’s boundaries.”

“These enmeshed or fused relationships are generally unhealthy, closed, rigid, and tend to discourage the fulfillment of one another’s needs and rights,” he continued (p. 49). “They tend not to support the mental, emotional, and spiritual growth of each person. Little or no ebb and flow of closeness and distance is allowed.”

One of the major manifestations of a dysfunctional, alcoholic, and/or abusive upbringing is codependence, which can be defined as “a disease of lost selfhood.”

“The origin of codependence,” according to Whitfield in another of his books, Co-Dependence: Healing the Human Condition (Health Communications, 1991, p. 22), “is primarily due to having grown up in a troubled, unhealthy, or dysfunctional family.”

“Wounded themselves,” he later states (p. 27), “the child’s parents feel inadequate, bad, and unfulfilled. They project those charged feelings onto others, especially onto their spouse and their vulnerable children… They look outside themselves to feel whole.”

“When we focus so much outside of ourselves, we lose touch with what is inside of us,” he wrote (p. 3): “our beliefs, thoughts, feelings, decisions, choices, experiences, wants, sensations, intuitions, unconscious experiences, and even indications of our physical functioning… ”

Identification of and reconnection with personal feelings is an important aspect of self-recovery.

“Since the parents and other members of such families tend themselves to be unable to listen to us, to support us, and to nurture, accept, and respect us,” he wrote in the Healing the Child Within book (p. 77), “we often have no one with whom we can share our feelings. The emotional pain hurts so much that we defend against them by… various unhealthy ego defenses… Doing so allows us to survive, although at a price. We become progressively numb. Out of touch. False. Codependent.”

The importance of feelings in a recovery program is not to be underestimated.

“(They) act as indicators or gauges at how we are doing at the moment and over a stretch of time” he concludes (p. 78). “They give us a sense of mastery and aliveness.”

Tantamount to the family separation needed to create a condition of autonomy is the replacement of a person’s physical parent with his virtual one-that is, of himself.

“By reparenting ourselves with gentleness, humor, love, and respect,” according to the Adult Children of Alcoholics textbook (p. 295), “we find our child within and true connection to a Higher Power.”

“(But) separation,” it also states (p. 430), “does not mean we are abandoning our family. It means we will have a separate identify. We will know where our feelings end and their feelings begin.”

That “inner child,” and releasing the shackles that once served as a protective sanctuary to retreat to, but later represented a prison, is the third major goal of recovery and facilitates the other two.

Deeply buried in a person’s psyche is the survival-sparked need for it, the long forgotten cocoon of the true self.

“The cause of codependence,” according to Whitfield in his Co-Dependence: Healing the Human Condition book (p. 27), “is a wounding of the true self to such an extent that to survive, it had to go into hiding most of the time, with the subsequent running of its life by the false or codependent self.”

Awaiting a person somewhere along his road to recovery is the rediscovery of his true or authentic self and its treasure chest of intrinsic worth, value, dreams, purposes, and love, the location of his personal direction, which was replaced early in life with his parents’ judgmental derailing. It is here where his critical inner parental voice exists and can now be replaced with his own affirming one.

The goal, in the end, of a spiritual twelve-step program is the reversal of the detrimental upbringing that caused an adult-child to lose himself very early in his life’s journey and replace it with the survival-necessitating false one.

Psychological Paranoia – A Theory As To Why Many High IQ Brains Suffer From Such Things

Higher IQ people are more apt to suffer from psychological paranoia – but why? Could it be that they have such large memories and memories which are so vivid that they pick up subtle nuances, patterns and anomalies easier and try to make meaning of it all? Over the years running a think tank, I’ve talked to a huge number of over-the-top intelligent folks, all of which seem to be carrying some quirks or psychological baggage with all that brilliance, so let’s talk shall we?

When explaining this theory to another high IQ individual he noted: “This is similar to how my brain works on a day to day basis, for someone who I assume has no mental condition your description of the thought process is uncannily similar to how I have attempted to explain things to my doctors (with little to no understanding from them).”

Well, since I use my brain so much, I’ve learned to use it in all different ways, and I practice those different types of thoughts. I have caught myself pondering coincidences which are seemingly random, but statistically improbable, and as I do this it triggers a notation, brainwave, release of chemicals, thus an imprintation into memory. So, I’ve noticed that and it appears that the spike in awareness imprints the memory so strongly, it’s like a photographic memory only “video memory” instead, which is requires the imprinting of lots more data than a mere picture of something, because it’s in motion and 3D. Also, it seems to reply later + dream defragging.

I find this interesting, and had postulated that if an individual brain enjoys this sort of chemical splash, brainwave sensation, they constantly look for connections in the deja vu realm, or coincidences that are unlikely yet have occurred, this becomes exciting, and although I don’t know, it appears that it could become an addiction, which might be good depending on one’s job.

Let’s say someone’s job was to protect the President, a prime minister, look for evil doers, terrorists, or a detective? Well, a brain that could do this would be well suited, looking for clues, things out of place, connections, etc. But if it became an internal natural brain chemical addiction, then it could run away with that brain whose new job is to find such clues to thus reward itself with that chemical flush.

A lawyer might like this type of brain, or someone who deals with complexity, computer programming etc. It is one way to think, still, there is a probability in the mathematical realm of improbability too, thus, there will be X amount of improbable events in life, not everything can be or appear to be in complete order.

Needless to say, a high IQ person needs to check their brains and realize that Occam’s Razor must rule the day, and that there will always be random events, and anomalies which they are more suited to find, but that can be a very good thing depending on their occupation. Think on this.

The Real Importance Of Dreams And Warnings

Many people tell me that they had a terrible nightmare, but when they woke up they were glad because they realized that it was just a dream. These people believe that dreams have no meaning. They believe that their dreams are produced by their imagination. This is why they disregard important warnings that they should respect.

I already showed you that all dreams are very meaningful, even the simplest ones. Thanks to Carl Jung’s discoveries today we know the scientific meaning of the dream images.

All dreams are produced by the unconscious mind discovered by Carl Jung, which is in fact God’s mind as I could discover because I precisely obeyed the guidance I had in my dreams, after recognizing that the unconscious mind was wise and had a saintly nature.

God produces your dreams in order to show you all the dangers that are threatening your conscience and your life. He also shows you how to solve your problems and develop your conscience.

So, you have to respect the importance of your dreams. They are images and scenes that contain precious messages.

After having a nightmare you must become worried and sad. I already showed you the meaning of many nightmares in my articles.

Many people believe that they are morally correct and that they will manage to always be moralistic because they ignore the fact that they have a satanic anti-conscience that is constantly negatively influencing their behavior or controlling their mind and behavior during numerous situations.

Now that we know that we have a terrible anti-conscience we have to stop being naïve, and protect our human side. Even though our satanic anti-conscience is stronger because it occupies the biggest part of our brain, our human conscience can tame the demon when we obey God’s guidance in our dreams.

Therefore, you have to be afraid of your evil self instead of trusting your sense of morality. You can easily fall into many traps and do many things you will regret having done, depending on the situation you are and depending on the stimuli of your environment.

Your mental health depends on your capacity to respect your moral principles when you are tempted to do something absurd and evil that seems to be advantageous for you, but is in fact a trap prepared by your satanic anti-conscience.

You must be afraid of all dangers instead of believing that you can control your behavior and you will never do something you disapprove. Your dreams help you avoid having a sad surprise because they show you dangers that you cannot see.

God doesn’t exaggerate when He shows you in your dreams that you can have the behavior of a prostitute or become a murderer. Unfortunately, you have inherited many absurd and evil tendencies. You cannot always control your behavior as you may believe.

You have to tame your anti-conscience and transform your wild conscience into a positive component of your human conscience. Otherwise, it will transform you into a cruel monster.

This is a difficult mission. God knows that you need His help in order to tame your terrible anti-conscience and become a wise and sensitive human being. This is why He sends you dreams with meaningful messages that reflect your mistakes and all the dangers that are threatening you.

You have to consciously accept to be transformed by God in order to tame your wild conscience.

Your dreams show you that you make numerous mistakes that work against you. You must learn how to always have the perfect behavior of a saint in order to become a true human being and definitively stop making mistakes.

You also have to stop passively accepting the horrors of the world. You have to help God make miracles thanks to your obedience to His guidance.

Your spiritual life is more important than your material life. Your goodness during your life defines your destiny after your death.

Therefore, you have to learn how to cultivate goodness in your heart, after eliminating the poison of hatred, which already is accumulated in your heart from the beginning of your life because you have inherited a satanic anti-conscience that likes terror.

The purification of your spirit is the most important matter of your life. You have to understand the importance of purity thanks to God’s lessons in your religion and in your dreams.

Carl Jung’s method of dream interpretation helped us understand the importance of religion. He managed to accurately translate God’s words in dreams, while he presented the dream producer as the incomprehensible unconscious mind, which seemed to be a strange organ that worked independently of our conscience.

God gives you scientific explanations about your brain in your dreams, which also help you understand the meaning of your religion. What really matters is the purification of your spirit and your transformation into a perfect human being. Everything else is simply part of this mission.

Whenever you have a bad dream or a nightmare you must seriously translate the meaning of your dreams for a certain period of time and follow God’s therapy because Satan is threatening your peace of mind.

Your satanic anti-conscience is terrible. It doesn’t let you find peace and evolve.

It existence is a tragedy because your capacity to think is a tragedy. Thinking is a very dangerous process that must be organized based on goodness in order to work in a positive way. Otherwise, it is a catastrophic process that influences your actions in a negative way. When you have absurd thoughts you also do absurd things that your conscience disapproves.

When you think in a disorganized way you are absurd. You have to organize your thoughts based on logical rules in order to think logically.

You have to learn how to successfully solve all problems based on goodness and wisdom in order to be a mentally healthy human being and think logically, while you purify your spirit. This is what your dreams help you accomplish.

Psychotherapy and Visualisation

Abstract:

In this paper I wish to describe the technique of visualisation in the process of psychotherapy as applied to clients in a counselling setting. There are two purposes for visualisation, the first being a technique of relaxation in a therapy session, guided imagination and ability to project thoughts and feelings onto the scene. The second, for home use, where imagery through art or illustration can help to projection and relaxation of the client (patient) in a controlled setting. The first part I shall show the verbal imagery in therapy and in the second the ability to use the technique for self-growth and cognitive insight.

Introduction:

Visualisation has been talked about and used in a haphazard way for many years, mostly in art therapy as a form of self-expression. This type of use is particularly helpful with children to non-verbalise feelings and thoughts, also with adults who find it difficult to communicate emotions verbally and need the support of art or visuals to enable them. In psychotherapy and mainly with adults my (1. 2017 SFM) form of visualisation is both expressive and revealing to the therapist and patient in the form of projection. Projection means transferring your feelings onto an object – in this case a verbalised visual image or a selected painting. In psychotherapy projection is often seen as a transference of feelings, emotion or identification with the therapist or object of interest. This has mainly been used with Thematic Appreciation Tests (2. 1930 Murray) or Rorschach Ink Blots (3. 1921 Rorschach) Both requiring analysis by a skilled practitioner in psychotherapy from historical data provided by the patient. Psychiatric use has mainly been a failure as to the medicalised nature of the interpretation leading to false outcomes and patient confusion.

In the first application of visualisation the client is attending a normal therapy session, usually the therapist has already determined the biographical history of the patient and is beginning to know his life position in relation to others and themselves. There is also by this time a certain understanding of cultural background and societal stance. To set the scene the therapist asks the client to relax, close their eyes and listen carefully to the description of a place, scene and story. The patient is told that at some point they will be asked to take over the story themselves and verbalise what they see and feel. What follows is the script often used to begin the process. Remembering the visualisation is in the mind of the client as verbalised by the therapist.

Script Example: technique one;

Therapist: I am going to talk you through a short journey, try to imagine inside your mind the scene I describe.

You are walking down a street that seems familiar to you
The house on both sides of the road are normal and with small gardens to the front
As you walk you can feel a cool breeze over your face – it is a very sunny day – warm and fresh
You feel relaxed and content – not particular worry or thoughts
As you go further down the street you notice a gap between the houses and a small railing in front
As you get nearer you notice the railing has a small gate leading to a park
You decide to enter the park and go through the gate
The park is small and rises to a small hill and dips out of sight
The park is mostly grass and bordered by trees on each side
As you enter you see a winding path lined with occasional wooden benches
In the distance you see a man walking his dog and a small child following him with a red balloon
You can not hear them as they are some distance away
You decide to sit down on one of the benches
You look up and can feel the warm sun on your face and the coolness of the light breeze
Birds are flying over with light tweets
You take off your shoes and let your bare feet gently touch the grass – it is still wet with morning
due and feels pleasant and relaxing
After a while you decide to walk on, the man and boy have long gone
As you reach the rise you can see down the other side of the park
You notice a gate and railing leading to a small lake with a beach area
It is deserted and peaceful – you decide to go and explore
Through the gate you find soft sand leading to the lake shore and take of your shoes and enjoy the feeling of the sand that is warm to the touch – you can hear birds overhead
You lie down on the sand, the sun is hotter now and you feel relaxed and warm
In the distance you see a figure walking towards you… the person seems familiar

Therapist: Now take over and tell me what is happening?

Client: I see…

Analysis:

At this point the client can verbalise their own imagined ending to the visualised story. Some patients with good imagination can go on to talk for sometime about who they met what was said, others can only identify the figure or express a fear response to the new character in the story, all can be very revealing as they allow the client to open a door of the unconscious to express their projected fears and desires including wish fulfilment. The therapist should tell the story in a low key voice with a steady delivery without emphasis on any particular point. The different suggestions enable the client to immerse themselves in the story as they imagine being there. The differing modalities are expressed in touch, feeling, sounds and sight, all enabling the client to realise a cognitive event inside their minds. The touch of the grass, the smell, the sound of birds, the feel of the Sun, and cool breeze all help to stimulate the visualisation of the story. Afterwards clients are asked specifically what they experienced and many report having heard the birds, felt the wet grass, the soft sand for example. The power of the mind to invent and elaborate is truly amazing experience for many clients in psychotherapy.

Once the client has experienced this in therapy the second way to use visualisation in a home setting is explored. Here the therapists suggests certain types of classical paintings that can act as the doorway into their own visualisation experience. The client having seen it work in practice with the therapist feel more empowered to try the technique for themselves.

Paintings: technique two:

In order to enable clients to self visualise at home (or office) they need a stimulus in absence of the verbal visualisation of the therapist. This is best achieved through classical country scenes that are familiar to most people. Artists such as Constable (UK) or Shishkin (Russian) often painted woods, distances of scenery and background country cottages excreta. These type of scenes can enable the client to create a walk in the countryside and imagine a story for themselves. The technique to be explained to the client is as follows;

Therapist: Find a comfortable place such as a sofa with the painting directly in front of you at a comfortable distance. Start at the closest point of the picture such as bottom right or left depending on the scene itself. Relax and get comfortable, your should be alone, with no distractions of noise or interruptions of phones or other disturbances. Allow yourself to start travelling within the scene, follow the path, the riverside, the treeline excreta, do not be in a hurry, notice real distances and your ability to walk gently and slowly through the scene. Imagine the characters you might meet, the feel of the ground, the wind, the sun, the trees, the terrain for example. It is OK to fall into a light meditation or even drift into sleep. After about 30 minutes it is alright to stop and review

The client should have a notebook to record sensations, thoughts and feelings as well as any storyline that came to pass. This can be taken to therapy sessions for joint analysis with the therapist’s support and insight. Painting are available in the internet very easily but a full scale painting or print is more desirable as this gives depth and better for projecting yourself into the imagined place. Clients often report an enhancement of mood with a relaxed feeling of well-being after they have been in visualisation for about 30 minutes each time. Those patients with anxiety can find this technique extremely comforting, depressive patients can seek inspiration and a sense of life’s purpose. Both techniques can invite insight and realisation from a cognitive perspective.

Summery:

In this paper we have discussed and explored two techniques of visualisation and their therapeutic advantage for meditation, stress relief, insight therapy, verbalisation through art and story telling. The first technique by being explored in therapy and then the second to allow the client to experience the cognitive benefits for themselves in their own time as homework or just a new way of relaxing from a high pressured lifestyle. Either technique in conjunction with their therapist can have profound insight into the mind of the patient (client) and allow for more insightful psychotherapeutic sessions to come. Along with dream analysis, visualisation can be a cornerstone of successful insightful therapy.

Reference:

  1. Myler S F (2017) All the above techniques and scripts are the copy-write of the author (unpublished)
  2. Henry A. Murray (1930) Thematic Appreciation Tests
  3. Hermann Rorschach (1921) Rorschach Inkblot Test

What Is The Prepping Lifestyle?

Are You Already Prepping?

I am willing to bet real money that you’re already prepping and do not realize it. Let’s see if you pass the test.

  1. When you go to the grocery store do you buy more than you need for just the next meal? If you do, you are a prepper. You are preparing for more than a single meal. You are buying for future meals too and you are going to store those supplies until needed. You are a prepper.
  2. When you buy supplies for meals do you buy things that are on “sale” like buy one, get one specials? If you do, you are a prepper.
  3. When you buy supplies like toilet paper, bottled water, trash bags and other items that come in bulk quantities like cases or boxes you are buying more than your immediate need. You are a prepper.
  4. Do you have food in your freezer? Then you are a prepper.
  5. Do you have food in a pantry? Then you are a prepper.

Granted, in each of these scenarios you are not buying huge quantities that will last a year, but you are buying more than your immediate need and preparing for your future needs. That is all prepping is.It is not the quantity of food or supplies that you have put back that makes you a prepper. It isn’t like you get to a certain amount and instantly turn into one. In reality, we all are preppers to some degree.

Now that we have that settled, let’s get into what some call “The Prepper Lifestyle”.

Take Prepping To The Next Level

Let’s take what you are already doing to the next level without breaking the bank. Here are some examples of prepping on a budget to get you started.

The grocery stores in our area are really good about running BOGOs or “Buy One, Get One” free promotions. This promotion allows you to buy an item at regular price and the get a 2nd one free. In reality, this is a 50% discount on both. For the benefit of prepping this allows you to buy 1 to eat now and the 2nd to go into your food storage. Easy and in some way this seems like you are building your preps for free.

Another promotion in our local stores is 10 for $10. That is you buy 10 of an item for $1 each. I love to use this promotion to buy packaged or boxed dinners, cans of soup, beef stew and chili.

The package and boxed dinners feed 2 people each. Add a protein like chicken, beef or pork and you can stretch these to feed 3 or more. Add a canned vegetable and you now feed a family of 4 easily.

For $30 you can buy enough to feed a couple or small family for a month. Do this for 3 months and you now have enough food storage for 90 days worth of meals. You are really making progress now.

Careful. You are starting to live the prepping lifestyle.

Living Like Our Forefathers

Looking at our pioneer heritage we see that these people spent every day struggling to feed themselves that day and still have enough to put back. They would put food back for themselves and their livestock. I am not suggesting that we all go back to this lifestyle. I am saying that we can learn from the way they lived their lives.

The prepping lifestyle is thinking about more than your immediate needs. Think about your needs for those times when you can’t simply run to the store for something to eat. Think about the needs of your family if the water coming out of the faucet is not fit to drink.

The prepping lifestyle is gathering for your family’s needs for when life’s emergencies happen. Weather, economic and unemployment disasters that happen all too often.

Conclusion

What are you doing today to prepare? How can you live the prepping lifestyle better?